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Mark Hollis Print Club London Screen Print

Mark Hollis

I am currently a fine artist, Happily Living and working in the wonderful City Of Bristol. U.K

I have sold work all over the world including: USA, Europe, and Australia.

My method allows a process of using my own scanned images of earlier prepared paintings,

Found, and Digital Photographs. This process can take a long time, as I spend much of the preparatory sessions, planning (the) exact positioning of objects, in relation to colour and weight.

A lot of the image structures that I use are a result from my walks in Bristol, Dartford, Thamesmead, Avonmouth,Essex, etc.

A certain Patina on concrete may take my eye, or I will obsess over an angle I find on a building, or light bouncing off a smokey mirrored, glass fronted, Monolith.

Once I am hooked on an aspect of an image I can then find a new idea I can use as a single image or be used in repeat. These (repeat) Motifs appear a lot, mirroring certainty, and a familiar Visual language, “smudged in” our day to day lives.

Colours, textures and the anchor point usually come from old canvas works , drawings and sketches.

Or I will be painting on paper, card and walls. I love Process, and it is very important that I have this analogue element of card, paper and paint to breathe some ghosts into the digital medium.

” These works question the ideas relating to perceived memory and how, now that we all live and work surrounded by technology, we act as a viewers and memory builders. Does technology alter our traditionally ‘romantic’ view of time and history? Are our memories now paused like a stuck video frame rather than a vague image?”